As promised, the House of Representatives’ newly elected Tea Party caucus is preparing to take a scalpel to the national budget. Understandably, they don’t want to touch things like defense spending, Medicare, and Social Security, because a high percentage of Tea Partiers are completely reliant on these government-run services. Instead, they are taking an even sharper scalpel to the other 36% of the budget, where so much wasteful spending often occurs on things such as education and scientific research.
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Feb.
16
2011
Innovation Meets Execution: The Death Penalty 2.0

TROPIGANDACUTION

For nearly our entire 10,000 year history, we humans have been banding together into mobs in order to single out those individuals we find deserving of our collective punishment. Sadly, in the 21st century, tried and true methods of retribution-infliction such as the crucifix, the noose, the firing squad, the guillotine, and the electric chair, have begun to fall out of favor. Popular concern for the rights of others has skyrocketed in recent decades, but this decline doesn’t necessarily signal that people don’t want the death penalty to exist. When you think about it, it’s obvious why executions are getting a bad rap: our current methods are inefficient, painful, and most importantly, lack the polished user experience we have come to expect from technology. As we’ve learned from startups in the Valley, a clean, simple, and elegant solution to this problem might just be enough to win people back and ignite growth in a market begging for upheaval.

As it stands, our methods of administering capital punishment are severely lacking in the user experience department. In the past, usability concerns had no place in the criminal justice system, but times have changed. If done right, global demand for modern execution technology could see explosive growth. So where is the American entrepreneurial spirit? Where is the disruption-through-innovation Silicon Valley is so proud of? Where is Death Penalty 2.0?

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